The student news site of Lake Brantley High School

The Brantley Banner

The Great American Eclipse

Senior+Alec+Spangler+traveled+to+South+Carolina+to+view+the+total+eclipse+on+Monday%2C+August+21.+%22Once+the+eclipse+becomes+total%2C+you+can+take+off+the+glasses+and+view+it+with+your+own+eyes%2C%22+Spangler+said.+%22It%27s+almost+as+if+the+sun+turned+black.%22
Senior Alec Spangler traveled to South Carolina to view the total eclipse on Monday, August 21.

Senior Alec Spangler traveled to South Carolina to view the total eclipse on Monday, August 21. "Once the eclipse becomes total, you can take off the glasses and view it with your own eyes," Spangler said. "It's almost as if the sun turned black."

Photo provided by: Alec Spangler

Photo provided by: Alec Spangler

Senior Alec Spangler traveled to South Carolina to view the total eclipse on Monday, August 21. "Once the eclipse becomes total, you can take off the glasses and view it with your own eyes," Spangler said. "It's almost as if the sun turned black."

Grace Staudenmaier, Staff Reporter

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






For the first time in 38 years a solar eclipse passed through the United States on Monday, August 21. A solar eclipse is when the moon is in perfect alignment between the sun and the earth. In states such as Florida, Alabama, and New Mexico there was a partial eclipse while other states, such as South Carolina, Oregon, and Georgia enjoyed a full eclipse. In this great American eclipse totality swept the nation from the Pacific to the Atlantic

Whether it was staying home and watching the event on T.V or stepping outside to catch a glimpse, NASA reported that this was the most viewed eclipse in history to date. All of the excitement stirred up by the event has the potential to greatly impact the scientific community.

“It means that people appreciate science and are interested,” astronomy teacher Dina Cavicchia said. “Hopefully it will inspire more young people to learn more about science.  For scientists, it means opportunity. So much solar research can only be done during eclipses.”

Some people are already making plans for the next eclipse. For example, physics teacher Stan Cutler is passionate about science and plans to travel to view totality during the next eclipse in 2024. He is hopeful about the lessons that can be learned by the general public after such an event.

“I think this will teach people to tune into science a little bit more and that there’s a lot of cool stuff going on in the world and if they open their eyes to meteor showers, and eclipses and rocket launches,” Cutler said. “There’s a lot of science going on that normally people ignore.”

In the days leading up to the event, both faculty and teachers made accommodations to help students view the eclipse. Seminole County Public Schools excused the absences of students who were signed out by their parents after 12:00 pm because the eclipse started at around 1:00 pm. Cavicchia and Cutler both spent the first moments of the eclipse in the courtyard with students to view it with eclipse glasses made specifically to ensure safety.

“I think it was really exciting because it happens so rarely,” senior Beatriz Arroch said. “ It was a really special thing to get to experience. I’m really glad I got to see it.”

However, some students hit the road and traveled to a different state for the chance to be in the path of totality where they could remove their glasses during the total eclipse. Senior Alec Spangler and his family traveled to Walterboro, South Carolina for this opportunity. They watched the event together from a state park.

“It’s almost if the sun had turned black,” Spangler said. “Everything around was dark and the stars were visible. It was night in the middle of the afternoon. Not to mention the bright white corona coming off the sun. When it was ending, the light coming back from the sun and the corona made it appear as if it was a diamond ring. I would describe it as the single best experience I’ve had.”

Photo provided by: Maddie Tolliver
Senior Maddie Tolliver stayed after school on Monday, August 21st to view the eclipse through glasses designed for a safe viewing, “It was an amazing experience,” Tolliver said. “When I put on the glasses it was like looking at a different sky entirely.”

 

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Leave a Comment

As a public forum for student expression, The Brantley Banner welcomes letters to the editor and comments on articles, but reserves the right to refuse inappropriate letters and comments.

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




Navigate Right
Navigate Left
  • The Great American Eclipse

    News

    Photos of the Week 10/30/17-11/3/17

  • The Great American Eclipse

    News

    Venezuela in troubling times

  • The Great American Eclipse

    News

    AP American Government and Macroeconomics’ new yearlong schedule

  • The Great American Eclipse

    News

    Aftermath of Irma

  • The Great American Eclipse

    News

    Hurricane Irma Affects Seminole

  • The Great American Eclipse

    News

    An increase in the Bright Futures scholarships

  • The Great American Eclipse

    News

    You had one job Irma

  • The Great American Eclipse

    News

    Homecoming Reschedule

  • News

    Employee Of The Year, Godshalk’s Streak Continues

  • The Great American Eclipse

    Arts and Entertainment

    The Olympics of Gaming

The student news site of Lake Brantley High School
The Great American Eclipse