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Venezuela in troubling times

The map depicts the diaspora of Venezuelans in the year 2010. Diaspora being the migration of people from their homeland.

Photo provided by: Xander Ordinola

The map depicts the diaspora of Venezuelans in the year 2010. Diaspora being the migration of people from their homeland.

Xander Ordinola, News Editor

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Since 2013, the country of Venezuela has been going through both economic and political hardships. The people are in extremely troubling times, with the oppressive army of President Nicolas Maduro hindering their freedoms daily. Following the death of previous President Hugo Chavez in March of 2013, Maduro was elected into office and is now classified as the dictator of Venezuela.

Currently, there are over 100 casualties and several others have been injured according to Toronto Star news. Additionally, not only is there a rising danger within the country, but inflation rates have skyrocketed in recent years. Rates are now reaching the near 1000s, compared to the average 32 percent, and they are expected to increase further in the following years. Currently, 1 US dollars is roughly equivalent to about 10-12,000 Venezuelan Bolivares on the black market. This makes it more difficult for citizens to get basic survival needs, such as food, medicine, clothing, and several other items due to the increased prices.

“I have heard from my friends that someone from their family has been killed,” Venezuelan  freshman Leonardo Campero said. “And it is hard, and for us who are outside of the country we all support what they are doing there in Venezuela.”

Luckily, many Venezuelans have been able to flee the country. Some have gone as close as Colombia, but others have fled as far as the United Kingdom and United States. For those living in non-Spanish dominant countries, the adjustment period has proven difficult.

“A positive outlook is always powerful,” English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) teacher Claribel Perez said. “As an ESOL teacher, I am impacted by their [students who recently came from Venezuela] lack of English language proficiency, where is it my honor and privilege to serve as their teacher, but also as their advocate during their transition processes.”

For Venezuelans who live in the US and still have citizenship with their native country, they will be able to participate in Venezuelan politics and elections when the opportunity arises. Some students, such as sophomore Gustavo Adrian, help to spread the word of the situation in Venezuela by using social media and making videos that support the people. Despite the massive support from family, friends, and teachers, adjusting to a new life can still be quite challenging.

“This impacted me because I had to leave my country and leave my family behind,” Venezuelan sophomore Allan Mendoza said. “Given the circumstances of the country, people are starving to death, there is no food, and there is no medicine for the people who need it. People go to the streets to protest for their rights but they can’t do it freely because the military starts to shoot them and kill them. [But] I miss my country so much and I want to go back.”

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About the Contributor
Xander Ordinola, News Editor
Xander Ordinola is in his senior year and is the News Editor of The Brantley Banner. This is Xander’s second year on staff, and now realizes that language and writing are useful tools in everyday life, thus, he hopes to become a novelist. But until that happens, Xander wants to gain a better understanding of...
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Venezuela in troubling times